CLIMBING KILIMANJARO

CLIMBING KILIMANJARO OVERVIEW

Mount Kilimanjaro is Africa’s highest mountain and the world’s tallest free-standing mountain. It is in the Kilimanjaro region, in the northern zone of Tanzania, East Africa. Normally, Kilimanjaro climbers stay in Moshi or Arusha towns a night before they start to climb the mountain. From these two towns, you will be transferred to the trekking starting gate which depends on the Kilimanjaro route you choose.
Most commercial planes land at Kilimanjaro International Airport, well known by acronyms KIA and JRO. The airport is located between Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions.
Some planes will land at Julius Nyerere International Airport (DAR/HTDA) which is situated in Dar es Salaam, the commercial capital of Tanzania. From Dar es salaam, you may fly to Kilimanjaro airport or take a bus to Moshi or Arusha. 

Key features of Mount Kilimanjaro

Mount Kilimanjaro is a very large volcano made of ash, lava, and rock, for that reason it is referred to as a stratovolcano. It has three volcanic cone-shaped peaks called Mawenzi, Shira, and Kibo.

Of the three peaks that exist on Mount Kilimanjaro, only the Kibo peak is dormant meaning it doesn’t show any sign of eruption now, but scientists say it has the possibility of erupting again. It is estimated that the last time it erupted was 360,000 years ago. The other two peaks are extinct.

Mount Kilimanjaro is a very large volcano made of ash, lava, and rock, for that reason it is referred to as a stratovolcano. It has three volcanic cone-shaped peaks called Mawenzi, Shira, and Kibo.

Of the three peaks that exist on Mount Kilimanjaro, only the Kibo peak is dormant meaning it doesn’t show any sign of eruption now, but scientists say it has the possibility of erupting again. It is estimated that the last time it erupted was 360,000 years ago. The other two peaks are extinct.

CHOOSING A MOUNT KILIMANJARO ROUTE

Kilimanjaro routes are trails you will use as you ascend and descend the highest mountain in Africa. There are 8 official Kilimanjaro routes. However, one route is only used for descending and for delivering supplies. This one route is called the Mweka route. Routes are established by Kilimanjaro National Park and they include the starting and ending gates with well define trails. Whereas Kilimanjaro itineraries are custom-made schedules of how to approach the trek using established Kilimanjaro routes. Kilimanjaro itineraries, therefore, include a number of days to be spent on the mountain, and day-by-day activities during the trek. This is why one Kilimanjaro route can have multiple itineraries. For example, the Machame route can be approached using a 6 days itinerary, 7 days itinerary, 8 days itinerary, or even more days.

 

KILIMANJARO CLIMB PACKAGES

Choose a route and itinerary that suits you

Great views and adventure

7 day Machame route climb

Popular questions about climbing Kilimanjaro

A: There is no power supply on the mountain. It is therefore important to ensure your electronic devices and head lamp are fully charged and bring along some extra batteries.

 

A:You don’t need to be an athlete or a highly trained mountaineer however you need some physical training to strengthen your muscles and get used to endurance because on the mountain you will be walking about 7 kilometers on many days. We recommend that your training for Kilimanjaro include strength training exercises and regular walks or jogging on different trails.

A: We do have a variety of food and cater for any dietary requirements. Most of the food will include carbohydrates and proteins, and of course some vegetables. Soups will be served daily. We recommend you to bring along some snacks as well.
A: Expect to trek on average 6- 8 hours. However this depend on the route and itinerary you have chosen. The longest and strenuous day is on your summit day trekking at least 14 hours.
A: We have prepared a list of recommended trekking gears. Click here to learn more.
A: Your daypack should weigh at most 7 kgs including 3 kgs of drinking water, while your duffel bags (carried by your porter should be at most 14 kgs.
A: The weather is quite unpredictable on Kilimanjaro, generally expects temperatures at 20F and may fall up to -20F. or sometimes below that.
A: Campsites are mostly furnished with basic pit latrines. There are public facilities commonly known as “long drops”. However, you can book from us a private portable toilet at an extra cost.
A: In case of such a scenario the trek will still continue because we have some of the crew members assigned as a rescue team in place to take care of the affected individual while the rest continue with the trek.
A: Our guides are highly trained on attitude sickness management, and are certified wilderness first responders. Every day the guides will ensure they check your Oxygen level at least twice using Pulse Oximeter. In case of an emergency, we have a rescue plan in place. Lightweight stretchers, a first aid kit, and an oxygen cylinder.
A: Mount Kilimanjaro is accessible all year round, however, it is best to climb during the dry season when the mountain is less precipitated, from the mid of December through to the beginning of March, and then from late June through the mid of October.
A: Yes, you need a visa. You can apply for a Tanzanian visa online. Click here – https://eservices.immigration.go.tz/visa/
A: Kilimanjaro climb is relatively safe. But, like in any other high altitude climb, there is a risk of high altitude sickness problems such as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE) and High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE). Our guides are well trained to identify the symptoms and provide first aid in extreme mountain situations. It is therefore important to follow our guides’ instructions and be open about your health and how you feel while you are on the mountain. You also need to choose a Kilimanjaro Itinerary wisely so at to take into consideration the acclimatization factor and your experience with high altitudes. We provide free advice related to what itinerary may best fit you. Contact us.
A: Not really. While you are at a high altitude you simply have to walk slowly and drink enough water. Just focus on your own pace while you are on the mountain. Even when others walk faster past you.